Blue Light Therapy Reviews: The 2 Best Home Devices (In 2014)

blue light acne reviews

I think you already know about the proven ability of blue light therapy to destroy acne causing bacteria – Without medication or toxin-filled creams.

Otherwise you wouldn’t be looking for blue light therapy reviews, right?

You are probably doing the right thing here, because blue light therapy was proven time and time again to be an extremely effective method to naturally destroy acne causing bacteria and prevent new acne from popping up on your face and ruining your life.

Thankfully, in 2014 you don’t have to pay thousands of dollars for endless sessions of blue light therapy. You can use the same technology at home with your own blue light therapy device (available to you 24/7) , while saving tons of money (and a lot of time).

The only questions left are:

Which blue light therapy home device is the most effective acne-killer? What should you look for in a home device? Is the treatment head size important? How long will it take to treat your all your acne?

And which one will give you all of this for the best price?

This is not as simple as choosing a new lamp for your bedroom, all the these questions have to be answered BEFORE you buy your blue light therapy home device. (Unless you don’t mind a huge disappointment and money wasted)

Do All Blue Light Home Devices Work the Same Way?

Blue light is a specific wavelength, in the 450 nm – 850 nm range and yes, all blue light home devices emit the same blue light, at about the same range which was proven most effective.

Blue light therapy basically takes the bacteria OUT of the equation. Many studies have found it to reduce acne by up to 80 (!!) percent. If you combine it with proper cleansing (and hopefully better lifestyle habits) you can take charge of your acne safely – Without medication or a dermatologist.

The Main Difference Between the Acne Blue Light Devices

Some devices only feature blue light, while others, like this one, combine red and infrared light along with the blue light.

The reason for this is that some studies have found that combining both blue and red light makes the treatment even more effective.

Red light therapy is proven to heal wounds faster nad has the ability to fade and prevent new acne scars. If you want to treat acne scars and speed up the healing of your skin after the acne bacteria is killed, you may want  to consider getting a blue & red light therapy device.

Is Blue Light Therapy Safe?

Generally, blue light therapy has no known side effects. It has no UV rays in it,  and is safe for almost everyone, except for people with Bi-Polar disorder, who should avoid exposure to blue light therapy.

I would suggest going for only FDA approved devices, to be even more on the safe side.

What You Need To Look for Before You Buy

The first thing you need to consider is the treatment area: Do you only have the occasional zit here and there? Or do you suffer from larger infected areas, such as your back or buttocks?

For small areas you’ll only need a handheld blue light therapy device. For larger areas you’ll need a table-top device, to cover everything in the same treatment time.

Below are some of the most important features you’ll need to look for before buying:

1. Treatment time – Obviously you want the minimum required treatment time (unless you have some extra time to kill…). Treatment time depends on one main thing: The treatment head size.

The bigger the treatment head, the bigger area it covers and the less treatment time you’ll need.

2. Blue Light / Blue + Red Light – As explained previously, some devices, like the best-selling Baby Quasar Blue, only feature blue light, while others, like the Lighstim Acne, combine both blue LED bulbs and red ones.

If you want to kill acne bacteria while speeding up recovery and preventing acne scars – Invest in a good blue & red light acne device.

3. FDA Approval – Anyone with a  good “set” of hands can make a blue light therapy device. I would want to know that someone checked the safety of my device and approved it.

The 2 devices I’ll recommend below are FDA approved.

4. Price – I don’t know why, but the prices differ significantly. You’ll have to find the most effective blue light device for you, with a reasonable price to go with it.

5. Warranty – What if your device suddenly stops working after 6 months? Or a year? Some companies offer 1 year warranty, others offer 2 years. Big difference.

Blue Light Therapy Reviews – The Top 2 Home Devices in 2014

Through my research, I’ve found The following 2 blue light therapy devices the best return on investment, and here’s why:

Baby Quasar Blue

baby quasar blue acne treatment

Baby Quasar Blue

The BQ Blue treatment head can cover about 1/6 of your face. That means you’ll need 12 minutes of treatment to cover your entire face, for example.

BQ Blue combines blue and violet LED lights and is well built and easy to use. It’s lightweight ( 8 x 6 x 3 inches ; 1 pounds) and sized to treat the unique contours of a woman’s face.

Treatment Frequency – You’ll need to use it at least 3 times a week (but you can do more) to maintain optimal results.

It has high ratings from users on Amazon, even from the skeptics (who thought it was too good to be true). You’d be smart to cheack them out (Here is where you’ll find them).

I’ll warn you though right now: You’ll have to be consistent and keep doing the treatment until you see the results. If you give up after a week you may find yourself highly dissapointed.

Downsides – The Baby Quasar Blue does not combine red light with the blue light. As I’ve mentioned before, combining red light will make your treatment more effective and faster.

Baby Quasar does have a combined treatment available, but its price tag is high and it involves 2 separate devices and double the treatment time.

The price – Though the price is not on the low side (300$+), it’sw worth every penny if you can take control and beat the annoying and unpleasant infections that attack your skin at the most inappropriate times.

I always recommd to buy on Amazon, because not inly do they great discounts, their return policy is the most reliable one in my experience. Plus, it comes from a full 6-day warranty from Quasar.

Lightstim Acne Light

Lightstim Acne

Lightstim Acne

Lightstim Acne seems like a much better buy to me. And here’s why:

The treatment head is bigger, which means less treatment time. Plus, the Lightstim Acne has a powerful combination of red, infrared and medical grade blue LED lights that not only kill the acne causing bacteria, but reduce redness and inflammation.

I always love a good 2-1 deals.

The price, surprisingly enough, is lower than the BQ Blue and the user ratings are almost as high.

Treatment Frequency – You can use it 3 times a week to every day, as long as you follow the instructions in the manual.

Warranty – 1 year.

Downsides – I’ve noticed a few complaints about the consistency of the light with the Lightstim and a few complaints about their customer service, which I haven’t seen much with the BQ Blue. This is something to take into consideration.

Price – Still over 300$, but less than the BQ. See the today price - HERE.

This concludes my blue light therapy 2014 reviews, I hope you found this helpful and I hope you try blue light therapy for acne to defeat your blemishes once and for all. If you have any comments or questions, I’m right here.

To your health & happiness,

Meital

 

 

Related Posts

Lightstim Acne Light Therapy – A Detailed Review

Tanda Clear Plus Review (& Comparison with Tanda Zap)

 

PAID ENDORSEMENT DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

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